Talent garden Advice and Nordea Sketchnote

This morning at Talent garden Rainmaking I attended two talks by industry professionals. Emma-Catrine Hvid from Nordea, had a wonderfully analogue presentation on “Sketching and ideation” using in handdrawn sketches on a flipchart to guide her talk. The majority of her time was a hands-on exercise “crazy 8” – which I already know and love. It is a great tool for getting fun ideas quickly. In just 8 minutes, the room collectively came up with 300+ ideas. I had a blast and would love to see what others came up with!

Anja Thrane, Client Director and Niels Tybjerg, Head of MarTech at @adviceas held a talk titled: “Answering the what and the why”.

My key take-away was that you should not just stop testing after product launch, but keep going (Like in curling). Focus on evolution rather than revolution. Because users are like lions, they act different in the zoo (in a focus group) from the Savanna (daily life).

One way to do this is through looking at the details of web analytics, and then using qualitative research to interpret the data you find, looking at context, channels used, and other needs.

Websummit 2018 teaser

This week I am in Lisbon, for Websummit. I am testing out new formats for my sketchnotes, one is a paper format which is easy to do standing up in a crowd and the other the iPad Pro. I want to use this opportunity to play around with the iPad format, and test out different apps. A review of these apps AND my wish for the ideal sketchnote app will come online later.

To be honest I have not have time to review my notes from this conference yet and a lot of my notes needs work done and cleanup before I can post them. Perhaps during my next holiday or if there is a special insterest in it, I will post the notes, along with a summary of the conference highlights.

DESIGN MATTERS 18 – 11 Sketchnotes

The past two days I have been live sketchnoting / graphic recording / visual scribing at the Design Matters conference in Copenhagen – an awesome conference for Designer made BY designers. A written summary of the sketchnotes will follow under each sketchnote.

I personally encouraged as many people as I could to start sketchnoting at the conference. I would love to see your notes if you did!

I have compressed these images – if you want a higher resolution image just contact me.

The first talk on the main stage was by Tobias Ahlin from Minecraft. My key take away from this was that he encourages us to:

Move from a paradigm of utilitarian work without any feelings, back to more expressive work! Emotionally engaging and simplicity is not in conflict!

Tobias used a matrix to prove this point – placing example cases from expressive to utilitarian and complex to minimalist.

I admit I am biased, because I really love the app, but the this talk was one of my favourites! Christine Cha and Vicky Tan from Headspace, did a talk about the brand journey of the company, as well as taking us through the their process of improving their onboarding retention. My key take away from this, was that:

Data can help you identify opportunities, not make decisions! Research and science can help you understand, and intuition can help fill in the gaps.

 

In just a few weeks Mckinsey Design will release a new big report on where to focus your money in the design process, based on looking at the 5% of cases that outperformed their peers. I am looking very much forward to reading it and perhaps summing it up visually in much more detail! Ben Sheppard, partner in Mckinsey Design, introduced the 4 areas tied to make design financials better. He emphasized that:

It is harder to outshine the competition and decide where to put the extra $. You need to focus on all 4 of these areas to elevate – or you should not bother at all!

These 4 areas are something we  as designers would probably think is common knowledge, and now we have numbers as proof to celebrate the importance of design.

The 4 areas are:

  1. More than a feeling (what would happen is half of your bonus was tied to your product’s amazon review?)
  2. More than a department (no ivory towers, your team should work physically together)
  3. More than a phase (involve designers in all phases)
  4. More than a product (design for the entire experience).

Designer Jack Koloskus from the Outline spoke their platform and Why and how they plan to fix the big media struggle, and in the process enable non designers to make good content.

 

Masuma Henry did a talk about “the business of the underserved”. By taking us through a traditional design process and adding a step to each, she urged us to shift our focus to make a change!

You can make a change – no matter the design position you are in!

You need to start:

  • Including and representing people who isn’t today!
  • Promote shared values and expose viewpoints that need it!

Along the way she showed us great examples, only two of which were from Amazon themselves.

 

Starting with sharing her personal story about the first time she tried to create change and failed because she lacked the right approach, Anisha Jan from Dropbox, shared with us a talk about how small learnings can add up to big changes! She took us though the 4 steps in the arch of change, from listening for the unexpected to amplifying beliefs! This framework can be used to utilize findings that you have previously ignored, and turn it into big changes.

A fortune cookies without the words of wisdom would be a pretty bland experience.

Ben Hersh from Medium took us through how to make you use words better (inspired by cognitive science), by first making them clear, then friendly and then expressive!

  • Clear: Reading takes time and work, choose words carefully! Make the rhythm of a text more like a fairy-tale, to make it easier to read.
  • Friendly: When you are alone your brain makes conversations with yourself. Use “you” instead of “I”, and treat people like you do in person! Say thanks and be polite.
  • Expressive: Who says the words or its typography changes how you think of the text itself

 

 

Vanessa Li from TikTok (previously Musical.ly) took us through 3 lessons of how they reduced friction in design to create a more immersive experience. The lesson I took with me the most,  was that even though they solved the problem of how to give money to broadcasters, they changes their minds and were not satisfied with the solution and made a new and much better one.

Did you know that 1/10 people have no clean drinking water? Charity water aims to change that, but how do they do that when 42% of Americans do not trust charities? Alyson Nakamura took us through the journey of Charity water and how their unique and close communication makes their doners feel close to them throughout their charity cycle of 21 months.

I am not personally into football at all – so to get me excited about Fifa19 was quite a challenge, and Felix Lai from Fifa18/Ea sports succeeded! The UX immsersion Matrix introduced in this talk functioned as a framework of describing how content go from abstract to realism, and functional to emotional. My biggest take away was that you can:

Use a UX Immersion Matrix and touchpoints to create a 3D emotional journey!

Man I wish there was a game like this but for something else than a sports – or maybe a different sport… like tennis or iceskating? I would be all in!

The last talk of the conference was by Teyosh, also known as Sofija Stankovic and Theodora Stojkovic. This talk went though some of the projects created by this pair, that balances benefiting society with something they find interesting. Dictionary of online behaviour can be found here, and I highly suggest you to have a look!

Innovationlab event – the art of connections

Today I participated in an Innovation lab event with the speaker Anders Sahl Hansen.

The key learning was the approach to using connections as a design mechanism. First you generalise the problem, then do intuitive research, use the principles of connections and lastly describe the end solutions. If you create a personal connection to your problem you get better solutions! Anders had a lot of nice examples that I will try to find the references for a later time, as well as his resources for inspiration e.g Ask nature.

Sketchnotes at Ladies First event on Digital trends

At Ladies First it was all about digital trends today when the sisters Astrid & Ingrid Haug stopped by Niels Brock for a talk each on the topic. Astrid just wrote a book in Danish which is on my wish list called “The future belongs to the fearless”, and Ingrid is behind the great conference called Design Matters which I hope to attend again in 2018.

Key Insights from Astrid’s talk was a nice overview of where we are currently withing digital trends (from SOME to wearables, robots, Internet of Things, AI, Big data, VR, AR, and thoughts about where we are going next.) We are part of shaping this new world through our Vision! As a thinking exercise you can ask yourself what you would do differently if you had to start your company today. Another thinking exercise is to design your own ultimate competitor. They think globally, have no office and few employees, not production costs and are very aware of their purpose and continually innovate.

Key insights from Ingrid’s talk were the 3 topics of: “Design for change”, “Immersive Worlds & Mixed Reality” and “Be a Rebel”. I hope these are some of the topics they will dive into in this years Design Matters conference.

Learnings from sketchnoting:

There is still room for a few details on especially the last sketchnote, which I will add tomorrow. I realized that I need to do a visual library exercise for different symbols and icons representing electricity, technology and digital, so my visual vocab is more varied. Right now the icons I think first, and use in the heat of the moment overlap too much.

 

Sketchnotes from IIAB Talks – Future Worksforce

Is it a Bird held IIAB talks last night, where 3 talented speakers had 15 minutes to talk about the future workforce without power point slides! Although I do understand why this obstruction was chosen, I am a very visual person and find it hard to just sit an listen, and was extra happy to be sketchnoting – otherwise I would not be able to remember as much as I do.

My favourite talk was by Thomas Nørmark, “the robot whisperer”. The key takeaway from this talk regarding the future workforce, is that with new tech there will be new and different jobs. We should not fear to be replaced by automasation, but more expect to supervise and work together with especially chatbots in the near future. In fact he even build a “clone”of himself as a chatbot (and an actual physical robot with a whole bunch of sensors), a ‘Robome’ to function as a secretary when he is not available. This has freed up a lot of time which was previously spent on answering a lot of generic work inquiries. From employees asking permission to buy a book or calling in sick, to even booking appointments with him. Sometimes it knows things he does not, like the location of the first aid kit. The tech of tomorrow is chatbots in all shapes and sizes, starting as babies and through training becoming very valuable assistants. In 100 years he expects us to, on some level, merge with tech.

 

Martin Grønbæk (from HK Lab) spoke about the future workforce form the perspective of the trade union. His main takeaway was that technology does not create change in itself – it is the people implementing the tech that create that change. As an example he spoke of the new health platform in Denmark and its implementation. We should not fear that the exponentially growing technology will bring less jobs, just different jobs. Just that we are part of defining! Chatbots will be your future coworker, and we will need chatbot trainers or builders which are not necessarily from IT, but from the field for which the chatbot is used.