DESIGN MATTERS 18 – 11 Sketchnotes

The past two days I have been live sketchnoting / graphic recording / visual scribing at the Design Matters conference in Copenhagen – an awesome conference for Designer made BY designers. A written summary of the sketchnotes will follow under each sketchnote.

I personally encouraged as many people as I could to start sketchnoting at the conference. I would love to see your notes if you did!

I have compressed these images – if you want a higher resolution image just contact me.

The first talk on the main stage was by Tobias Ahlin from Minecraft. My key take away from this was that he encourages us to:

Move from a paradigm of utilitarian work without any feelings, back to more expressive work! Emotionally engaging and simplicity is not in conflict!

Tobias used a matrix to prove this point – placing example cases from expressive to utilitarian and complex to minimalist.

I admit I am biased, because I really love the app, but the this talk was one of my favourites! Christine Cha and Vicky Tan from Headspace, did a talk about the brand journey of the company, as well as taking us through the their process of improving their onboarding retention. My key take away from this, was that:

Data can help you identify opportunities, not make decisions! Research and science can help you understand, and intuition can help fill in the gaps.

 

In just a few weeks Mckinsey Design will release a new big report on where to focus your money in the design process, based on looking at the 5% of cases that outperformed their peers. I am looking very much forward to reading it and perhaps summing it up visually in much more detail! Ben Sheppard, partner in Mckinsey Design, introduced the 4 areas tied to make design financials better. He emphasized that:

It is harder to outshine the competition and decide where to put the extra $. You need to focus on all 4 of these areas to elevate – or you should not bother at all!

These 4 areas are something we  as designers would probably think is common knowledge, and now we have numbers as proof to celebrate the importance of design.

The 4 areas are:

  1. More than a feeling (what would happen is half of your bonus was tied to your product’s amazon review?)
  2. More than a department (no ivory towers, your team should work physically together)
  3. More than a phase (involve designers in all phases)
  4. More than a product (design for the entire experience).

Designer Jack Koloskus from the Outline spoke their platform and Why and how they plan to fix the big media struggle, and in the process enable non designers to make good content.

 

Masuma Henry did a talk about “the business of the underserved”. By taking us through a traditional design process and adding a step to each, she urged us to shift our focus to make a change!

You can make a change – no matter the design position you are in!

You need to start:

  • Including and representing people who isn’t today!
  • Promote shared values and expose viewpoints that need it!

Along the way she showed us great examples, only two of which were from Amazon themselves.

 

Starting with sharing her personal story about the first time she tried to create change and failed because she lacked the right approach, Anisha Jan from Dropbox, shared with us a talk about how small learnings can add up to big changes! She took us though the 4 steps in the arch of change, from listening for the unexpected to amplifying beliefs! This framework can be used to utilize findings that you have previously ignored, and turn it into big changes.

A fortune cookies without the words of wisdom would be a pretty bland experience.

Ben Hersh from Medium took us through how to make you use words better (inspired by cognitive science), by first making them clear, then friendly and then expressive!

  • Clear: Reading takes time and work, choose words carefully! Make the rhythm of a text more like a fairy-tale, to make it easier to read.
  • Friendly: When you are alone your brain makes conversations with yourself. Use “you” instead of “I”, and treat people like you do in person! Say thanks and be polite.
  • Expressive: Who says the words or its typography changes how you think of the text itself

 

 

Vanessa Li from TikTok (previously Musical.ly) took us through 3 lessons of how they reduced friction in design to create a more immersive experience. The lesson I took with me the most,  was that even though they solved the problem of how to give money to broadcasters, they changes their minds and were not satisfied with the solution and made a new and much better one.

Did you know that 1/10 people have no clean drinking water? Charity water aims to change that, but how do they do that when 42% of Americans do not trust charities? Alyson Nakamura took us through the journey of Charity water and how their unique and close communication makes their doners feel close to them throughout their charity cycle of 21 months.

I am not personally into football at all – so to get me excited about Fifa19 was quite a challenge, and Felix Lai from Fifa18/Ea sports succeeded! The UX immsersion Matrix introduced in this talk functioned as a framework of describing how content go from abstract to realism, and functional to emotional. My biggest take away was that you can:

Use a UX Immersion Matrix and touchpoints to create a 3D emotional journey!

Man I wish there was a game like this but for something else than a sports – or maybe a different sport… like tennis or iceskating? I would be all in!

The last talk of the conference was by Teyosh, also known as Sofija Stankovic and Theodora Stojkovic. This talk went though some of the projects created by this pair, that balances benefiting society with something they find interesting. Dictionary of online behaviour can be found here, and I highly suggest you to have a look!

Sketchnotes from UX Copenhagen 2018

I attended UX Copenhagen at DGI Byen this year, and did live portraits of all speakers as well as sketchnotes. Videos of the talks from the event can be found here.

The talk by Molly Watt was about the importance of inclusive design and accessible tech. Her key takeaway was that inclusive design can benefit not only the minority but the majority.

Her talk provides an overview of the different categories within inclusive design (Vision, hearing, motor, cognitive) as well as introducing some of the assistive tech that has been a game changer for so many people. It was one of the most personal and moving talks at the conference, because it included her own personal story of constantly battling misconceptions about Deaf-blindness. After Molly’s talk I was Lucky and got to meet her sweet guidedog Isabella too!

Anne Thyme Nørregaard from Siteimprove spoke about accessibility from a business angle, speaking a language investors understand! She argued for accessibility not only being the ethical choice but the smart choice as well, because it it can bring you increased revenue and a better user experience.

Janne Jul Jensen, Senior UX architect from LEGO, says that you should not invest in tools, but invest in people! Her talk advocates for why you need UX in your company, comparing the UX field to the field of Architects (Would you build your house yourself?) and to cooking (a chef perfectly balances the rules of the field chen creating!).

 

Laura Kalbag wrote a book called Accessibility for Everyone, and is an advocate of that you should be the change you want to see in the world! She presented 7 ways to how you can be part of this positive change, from being the “advicer” to “questioner” or at least “supporter” of others doing it. During her talk she used the visual metaphor of carrots vs. sticks in order to show examples that the motivation for building accessible products can have two sides to it. Later she used an apple to illustrate the different layers in products, from the seed (your intent), to the core (human rights), the flesh (the content) and finally the peel (the visuals / the delight). One of her key points was that you draw the line when Technology goes from harming yourself to something that might harm other people! And you should not be afraid of talking about this even though it is risky!

Louise Fuglesang from Edenspiekermann makes a case for how work with children can inspire us to design more ethically. She talks of the design principles and rights that came out of a Unicef conference in Helsinki she was part of, and how these rules should perhaps not just apply to just children! What is all products and services considered these principles and rules? Because Kids might also use something that is not designed for them.

 

The talk by Mark Bowers on the new reality of image manipulation blew me away! Some of these examples I had seen before, but never collected together like this. What we will soon be able to pull off will be a game changer! His key point was that when our brains are able to recognize the images as real, as truth, what happens? When we can generate an image as easily as capturing it no one can trust images anymore at all.

Dramatic music. An Atomic Bomb going off on the big screen. Mike Monteiro has arrived and hands out his booklet of 10 rules of ethics to an intrigued audience. Starting with his reason for not being on twitter anymore (they are cowardly and opportunistic and should ban Trump…) he makes a case for why these “white boys” behind the big cooperation have a responsibility when the release something into the world that impacts so many people. “You need a license to be a doctor or even a dog walker…but not to work with our privacy” he says. His Key point is that You are FREE, help others be FREE. You are lucky. We are ordinary people. Your job is a choice, please to it right. Have a spine and say NO! And follow these 10 rules.

Rolf Molich From Dialog Design did a talk on Ethical Dilemmas in User Experience. His key point was that sometimes it is necessary to say NO and face the consequences. He posed 4 ethical dilemmas for a UX’er to the room that we had to answer through a survey on a phones live, and discussed the results. On the scroll you can see the UXPA code of conduct, which you should follow.

Stine Mosegaard Vilhelmsen from Design-people talked about Design and Innovation with a gender lens, focusing on the female consumers as a business potential. She begins with covering 6 reasons why you should design for women, from the fact that they control almost 80% of the spending worldwide to the fact that womens income is on the rise. Men design for other men, but that should stop because studies show that the traits that control spending decisions differs between men and women! There are no difference in abilities between the genders, but the motivation is different. Don’t just “pink it up” when you market a product to women, understand that they view the product as a whole experience rather than its features. Include women in the testing of products! Did you know a lot of medicine is only tested on men? And a lot of car safety is only tested on male dummies? When Apple released their health app they had forgotten about the menstrual cycle tracking in the first version.

The talk by Tim Daniel Hansen on the topic of Sex robots and ethics (and my discussion with him afterwards about the use of child robots…) will haunt me for a long time to come. During his talk he showed footage of how a sex robot is made – and it is much less like the elegant but scary techy intro of Westworld and more like making human sized Barbies… but somehow because of all the parts dangling around being assembled, it made me think of a slaughterhouse….

In his talk Tim asks the question “Do android get erotic nightmares?” and the answer is yes. If we continue to not take ethical and tech aspects seriously both humans and robots will get nightmares. His reason for asking this question is because first of all we are in a moment in history where singularity might not be far off. Secondly he gets furious when he sees tech titans not taking responsibility. And last but not least because responsible development comes from within!

 

The talk by Dave Dylan Thomas on designing for cognitive bias was really interesting, and I will have to go through the 100+ different biases myself sometime! Some of the biases he goes through were, “Illusion of control”, “Confirmation bias”, “bandwagon effect” , “choice architecture”, “Recency” and more! His key point was that we should use these mental shortcuts for GOOD! We cannot avoid them even when we are aware of them, so we should design knowing of their existence instead. A good example is to do blind resumes.

The Workshop by Teo Choong Ching from Rakuten Viki (I am a BIG fan of their tv show Dramaworld!) was on using sketchstorming. During his workshop we were introduced to working visually with idea generation and its benefits, and guided through a practical demonstration in groups.

 

Visual Library cards

Creating the cards itself started as a practice exercise for expanding my symbolic visual vocabulary, and thus also functions as an external visual library. A deck of icon cards can be used in varying ways, and this set of cards was created in order to function as an icebreaker exercise for a workshop.

 

Icebreaker exercise with icon cards

Participants were asked to choose the icons they found most represented the answer to specific questions. Thus we got the participant to start thinking about the topic for the workshop before the agenda was even presented. The icons on this deck of cards may seem random, but are chosen because they have different typical symbolic meanings attached to them. Asking the participants to choose two or more cards, created a dynamic between the cards that further makes the participant think creatively. It is important to get the participants to explain with their own words why they have chosen their cards.

My current collection is 100+ cards and growing.

 

My Tool Collection

This post is the masterlist of my growing physical design tool collection, which I will go back an edit as I acquire new tools. At the moment my wishlist is longer than my collection. If you want to sponsor a tool, contact me. Eventually I will indicate how often I use each of these and categorize them. Reviews will follow for each of the tools as I get a chance to properly test them.

My tool collection

Toolkits created by me

My tool wishlist

 

See both my BOOK WISH LIST and my BOOK SHELF for a list of my book recommendations.

 

 

 

Book wish list

For christmas this year I am wishing for some nice visual thinking books. I especially want this Visual Thinking by Willemien Brand which came out here in 2017. I have been wanting to get my hands on it since then, but have been too busy with my Master thesis.

The following books are on my wishlist for my physical collection. Some I have read in e-book or heard in audiobook format already, but wish for the physical copy. Call me old fashioned, but I love to see the books on my shelf and be able to hold them in my hands. Most of these books I have borrowed from the library (some of them several times). Some of them I haven’t read yet, but skimmed through. Some I just think look good. I will update this post when I find more books that I want to own.

I plan to do book reviews of my favourite books and sketchnote summaries, you will be able to see the overview of those here on my Book shelf.

 

book_drawtowin back_of_napkin_book visual-meetings-cover-300px Visual-Teams-book-image  51vsAK6onSL._SX392_BO1,204,203,200_       

Sketchnotes from Service Design Ignition 2017

Today I am sketchnoting at Service Design Ignition – a conference I helped co-organize since august, taking place at the Danish National museum.

The featured image is of my in-the-making sketchnotes from our hosts introduction during the event. I was sketchnoting for all the talks – but since I help co-organize I had other duties than sketchnoting during the day and did not finish all the sketchnotes. The one from Innovationshuset, , is it a bird, Koos and Eggs will be up after my thesis has been handed in in the beginning of December. See more images from the day here.

Picture from the workshop (taken by Anja Byriel Kronborg) that I helped plan together with Helena Levison,
who was also the facilitator of the workshop.

The host (Ian Wisler-Poulsen) introduction + an overview of the conference speakers

 

Talk by Mie Nørgaard on Sketching, thinking and developing ideas

It was really great to see images from cases where she worked as a graphic facilitator in design processes.

Talk by Mette Mikkelsen on a case aboue designing anthropomorphism for a nursing home


 

Sabine Storm on how design thinking will give you a better product

 

Diana from Innovationshuset
Skecthnote coming soon (missed sketching some of the talk because I was preparing for the workshop at the same time). 

 

Niels Corsten from Koos on Service Design Spring methodology cases
Finished Sketchnote coming monday 13/11/17

Jan Walter From EGGS
Skecthnote coming soon (after my thesis, because the deadline is 1/12/17).

The Hands-on Sketching Workshop by Helena Levison and Line Cecilie Barfod (me)
Helena Levison and I planned the hands-on sketching workshop (using it to verify some findings from my thesis) and she facilitated it so well. There will be a summary of the workshop up eventually in its own blogpost.

Sketchnote coming soon

 

Thank you for a great conference!

 

 

 

Graphic Facilitation Literature Review

The featured image is of David Sibbet (image from this page).

An increasing number of books exists on the topic of Visual Facilitation, usually actively focusing on the sub practice of Graphic Facilitation (GF) or Graphic Recording from different practitioners point of view, outlining and sometimes even teaching their process based on personal experience. This is an overview of some of these books I have read (and based my short academic paper on). I will update the list, as I read more books about the subject.

David Sibbet, is one of the most internationally well known practitioners of GF, with more than 30 years of experience. His definition of his job with GF is “…using graphics to facilitate group communication” (Sibbet, 2008). According to Sibbet, GF has the ability to engage people, move people to big picture thinking as well as help them remember better. He refers to the sketch artifact created during this GF session as a “publicly-validated group memory” (Sibbet, 2008).

Aside from this article, Sibbet has also published a number of howto books I recommend:

 

visual-meetings-cover-300px     Visual-Teams-book-image

Another of the big players in the field is the GF practitioner Christine Valenza, the co-author, with Nancy Margulies, of the award winning book “Visual Thinking; Tools for Mapping Your Ideas.” This book is still on my wishlist.

In 2009 Valenza published a paper together with the illustrator Jan Adkins “Understanding visual thinking”, discussing the historical context, which gave rise to GF in 2009 (Valenza & Adkins, 2009). In their text they mention David Sibbet as a key influencer of the practise, citing him as the creator of the GF style they refer to as the “Big paper approach”, which they are clear advocates of. They go so far as to call the “big-Paper” artifact an additional member of the meeting (Valenza & Adkins, 2009).

That same year David Sibbet published a chapter for a book called “the change handbook” with the aforementioned practitioner Nancy Margulies. In this chapter titled: “Visual recording and graphic facilitation: Helping people see what they mean”, Margulies & Sibbet describe the real-time illustration of words and images used to guide a group to work together and communicate more effectively as both ‘Visual recording’ and ‘graphic facilitation’. The difference between these two sub-categories according to Margulies & Sibbet and is that:

“…people who focus on just recording are called visual or graphic recorders and those who combine facilitation and recording are called graphic facilitators. However, the combinations and variations are rich” (Margulies & Sibbet, 2009).

One of these variations that they point out, is that the practitioners sometimes visualize presentations outside of the group and other times work with a facilitators in front of the room (Margulies & Sibbet, 2009).

Sibbet, Marguiles and Valenca & Adkins all agree that the practices they discuss all contain a social group aspect, and involves creating visuals on a large scale in front of or with a group. This places the practice both within the field of creation of visuals and the practice of facilitating communication in groups.

 

References:

Margulies, N., & Sibbet, D (2009): Chapter 61 by Margulies, N., & Sibbet, D. from Holman, P., Devane, T., & Cady, S. (2007). The change handbook: The definitive resource on today’s best methods for engaging whole systems. Berrett-Koehler Publishers. Link

Sibbet, D. (2008). Visual intelligence: Using the deep patterns of visual language to build cognitive skills. Theory Into Practice, 47(2), 118–127. doi:10.1080/00405840801992306 Link

Rohde, Mike (2012). The Sketchnote Handbook: the illustrated guide to visual note taking, Peachpit Press.

Valenza, C., & Adkins, J. (2009). TIMELINES Understanding visual thinking. interactions, 16(4), 38. doi:10.1145/1551986.1551994 Link