Sketchnotes from UX Copenhagen 2018

I attended UX Copenhagen at DGI Byen this year, and did live portraits of all speakers as well as sketchnotes. Videos of the talks from the event can be found here.

The talk by Molly Watt was about the importance of inclusive design and accessible tech. Her key takeaway was that inclusive design can benefit not only the minority but the majority.

Her talk provides an overview of the different categories within inclusive design (Vision, hearing, motor, cognitive) as well as introducing some of the assistive tech that has been a game changer for so many people. It was one of the most personal and moving talks at the conference, because it included her own personal story of constantly battling misconceptions about Deaf-blindness. After Molly’s talk I was Lucky and got to meet her sweet guidedog Isabella too!

Anne Thyme Nørregaard from Siteimprove spoke about accessibility from a business angle, speaking a language investors understand! She argued for accessibility not only being the ethical choice but the smart choice as well, because it it can bring you increased revenue and a better user experience.

Janne Jul Jensen, Senior UX architect from LEGO, says that you should not invest in tools, but invest in people! Her talk advocates for why you need UX in your company, comparing the UX field to the field of Architects (Would you build your house yourself?) and to cooking (a chef perfectly balances the rules of the field chen creating!).

 

Laura Kalbag wrote a book called Accessibility for Everyone, and is an advocate of that you should be the change you want to see in the world! She presented 7 ways to how you can be part of this positive change, from being the “advicer” to “questioner” or at least “supporter” of others doing it. During her talk she used the visual metaphor of carrots vs. sticks in order to show examples that the motivation for building accessible products can have two sides to it. Later she used an apple to illustrate the different layers in products, from the seed (your intent), to the core (human rights), the flesh (the content) and finally the peel (the visuals / the delight). One of her key points was that you draw the line when Technology goes from harming yourself to something that might harm other people! And you should not be afraid of talking about this even though it is risky!

Louise Fuglesang from Edenspiekermann makes a case for how work with children can inspire us to design more ethically. She talks of the design principles and rights that came out of a Unicef conference in Helsinki she was part of, and how these rules should perhaps not just apply to just children! What is all products and services considered these principles and rules? Because Kids might also use something that is not designed for them.

 

The talk by Mark Bowers on the new reality of image manipulation blew me away! Some of these examples I had seen before, but never collected together like this. What we will soon be able to pull off will be a game changer! His key point was that when our brains are able to recognize the images as real, as truth, what happens? When we can generate an image as easily as capturing it no one can trust images anymore at all.

Dramatic music. An Atomic Bomb going off on the big screen. Mike Monteiro has arrived and hands out his booklet of 10 rules of ethics to an intrigued audience. Starting with his reason for not being on twitter anymore (they are cowardly and opportunistic and should ban Trump…) he makes a case for why these “white boys” behind the big cooperation have a responsibility when the release something into the world that impacts so many people. “You need a license to be a doctor or even a dog walker…but not to work with our privacy” he says. His Key point is that You are FREE, help others be FREE. You are lucky. We are ordinary people. Your job is a choice, please to it right. Have a spine and say NO! And follow these 10 rules.

Rolf Molich From Dialog Design did a talk on Ethical Dilemmas in User Experience. His key point was that sometimes it is necessary to say NO and face the consequences. He posed 4 ethical dilemmas for a UX’er to the room that we had to answer through a survey on a phones live, and discussed the results. On the scroll you can see the UXPA code of conduct, which you should follow.

Stine Mosegaard Vilhelmsen from Design-people talked about Design and Innovation with a gender lens, focusing on the female consumers as a business potential. She begins with covering 6 reasons why you should design for women, from the fact that they control almost 80% of the spending worldwide to the fact that womens income is on the rise. Men design for other men, but that should stop because studies show that the traits that control spending decisions differs between men and women! There are no difference in abilities between the genders, but the motivation is different. Don’t just “pink it up” when you market a product to women, understand that they view the product as a whole experience rather than its features. Include women in the testing of products! Did you know a lot of medicine is only tested on men? And a lot of car safety is only tested on male dummies? When Apple released their health app they had forgotten about the menstrual cycle tracking in the first version.

The talk by Tim Daniel Hansen on the topic of Sex robots and ethics (and my discussion with him afterwards about the use of child robots…) will haunt me for a long time to come. During his talk he showed footage of how a sex robot is made – and it is much less like the elegant but scary techy intro of Westworld and more like making human sized Barbies… but somehow because of all the parts dangling around being assembled, it made me think of a slaughterhouse….

In his talk Tim asks the question “Do android get erotic nightmares?” and the answer is yes. If we continue to not take ethical and tech aspects seriously both humans and robots will get nightmares. His reason for asking this question is because first of all we are in a moment in history where singularity might not be far off. Secondly he gets furious when he sees tech titans not taking responsibility. And last but not least because responsible development comes from within!

 

The talk by Dave Dylan Thomas on designing for cognitive bias was really interesting, and I will have to go through the 100+ different biases myself sometime! Some of the biases he goes through were, “Illusion of control”, “Confirmation bias”, “bandwagon effect” , “choice architecture”, “Recency” and more! His key point was that we should use these mental shortcuts for GOOD! We cannot avoid them even when we are aware of them, so we should design knowing of their existence instead. A good example is to do blind resumes.

The Workshop by Teo Choong Ching from Rakuten Viki (I am a BIG fan of their tv show Dramaworld!) was on using sketchstorming. During his workshop we were introduced to working visually with idea generation and its benefits, and guided through a practical demonstration in groups.

 

Visual Library cards

Creating the cards itself started as a practice exercise for expanding my symbolic visual vocabulary, and thus also functions as an external visual library. A deck of icon cards can be used in varying ways, and this set of cards was created in order to function as an icebreaker exercise for a workshop.

 

Icebreaker exercise with icon cards

Participants were asked to choose the icons they found most represented the answer to specific questions. Thus we got the participant to start thinking about the topic for the workshop before the agenda was even presented. The icons on this deck of cards may seem random, but are chosen because they have different typical symbolic meanings attached to them. Asking the participants to choose two or more cards, created a dynamic between the cards that further makes the participant think creatively. It is important to get the participants to explain with their own words why they have chosen their cards.

My current collection is 100+ cards and growing.

 

My Tool Collection

This post is the masterlist of my growing physical design tool collection, which I will go back an edit as I acquire new tools. At the moment my wishlist is longer than my collection. If you want to sponsor a tool, contact me. Eventually I will indicate how often I use each of these and categorize them. Reviews will follow for each of the tools as I get a chance to properly test them.

My tool collection

Toolkits created by me

My tool wishlist

 

See both my BOOK WISH LIST and my BOOK SHELF for a list of my book recommendations.

 

 

 

Visualization of my thesis process

I am not a student anymore. Yesterday I defended my thesis project on co-creation workshops, and I now have a Masters Digital Design and Communication from the IT university of Copenhagen. It has been a long road, with a lot of research and observations. Some of the information from the thesis is confidential, and thus I cannot share the thesis itself. I am planning on publishing the relevant findings alongside the workshop canvas I have created. Right now it is still a prototype, and I plan to launch it as a tool in Spring 2018. If anyone reading this will give me access to observe more workshop, especially co-design workshops, I would greatly appreciate it.

The following is a visual representation of my thesis process.

 

 

Sketchnotes from Service Design Ignition 2017

Today I am sketchnoting at Service Design Ignition – a conference I helped co-organize since august, taking place at the Danish National museum.

The featured image is of my in-the-making sketchnotes from our hosts introduction during the event. I was sketchnoting for all the talks – but since I help co-organize I had other duties than sketchnoting during the day and did not finish all the sketchnotes. The one from Innovationshuset, , is it a bird, Koos and Eggs will be up after my thesis has been handed in in the beginning of December. See more images from the day here.

Picture from the workshop (taken by Anja Byriel Kronborg) that I helped plan together with Helena Levison,
who was also the facilitator of the workshop.

The host (Ian Wisler-Poulsen) introduction + an overview of the conference speakers

 

Talk by Mie Nørgaard on Sketching, thinking and developing ideas

It was really great to see images from cases where she worked as a graphic facilitator in design processes.

Talk by Mette Mikkelsen on a case aboue designing anthropomorphism for a nursing home


 

Sabine Storm on how design thinking will give you a better product

 

Diana from Innovationshuset
Skecthnote coming soon (missed sketching some of the talk because I was preparing for the workshop at the same time). 

 

Niels Corsten from Koos on Service Design Spring methodology cases
Finished Sketchnote coming monday 13/11/17

Jan Walter From EGGS
Skecthnote coming soon (after my thesis, because the deadline is 1/12/17).

The Hands-on Sketching Workshop by Helena Levison and Line Cecilie Barfod (me)
Helena Levison and I planned the hands-on sketching workshop (using it to verify some findings from my thesis) and she facilitated it so well. There will be a summary of the workshop up eventually in its own blogpost.

Sketchnote coming soon

 

Thank you for a great conference!

 

 

 

My Master thesis on workshops

As you can see from this blog, I prefer to work visually. One way is through sketching, but another is through contextual frames. I am in the process of creating a tool that will help plan educational/design workshops as part of my Master thesis at the IT university. Creating a “workshop canvas” is an idea I have had for a while, and I will present it here officially when I have handed in my thesis in December.

My problem statement is the following:

“Through looking at how established and talented people plan and facilitate workshops at some of the biggest design conferences in Denmark, I will attempt to create a toolkit for people with little or no experience to be able to plan big scale collaborative workshops effectively.”